Tomahawk new ride

Tomos ST 50cc 2-speed automatic, auto mix oil injection.

This bike was supposed to be a commissioned top tank project but it didn’t happen. So I decided to keep it as my new daily ride. I’ll eventually convert it to a top tank later.

I’m having so much fun and will keep it stock during the break in period. But I’m sure it’s just a matter of time before I open up the engine to modify the clutch, secondary transmission, port the stock cylinder, modify the stock pipe, and upjet the carb for better top speed at barely no cost.

Compared to my custom motobecane or peugeot mopeds I noticed right away that Tomos stock mopeds don’t feel very stable. But I guess I’ll get used to it and adapt my riding style. I kinda want to race it against other stock Tomos mopeds Sat June 2nd at Grange’ race track.

First day out and I already got some compliments at the corner market. A 2012 Tomos moped doesn’t look as cool as a custom vintage moped but still gets noticed for only $1300 ST version and $1100 Sprint premix fuel/oil version (no turn signals, small headlight fairing).

Smooth ride from Tomashop Filipino Town to Downtown LA – Disney Concert Hall.

European version :

TOMOS EX

BONUS PICS:

The Tomashop is almost done. We’re gonna throw a little BBQ party for the grand opening next Friday 18th starting at 7:30 pm. Very casual, stop by and say hello.

PLUS,

Look what I spotted on the parking lot of Home Depot, a rare Citroen 2cv “two horsepower” (taxable 2hp), rad…

Incroyable, une “deux chevaux” garee sur le parking d’un grand magasin de bricolage pres de chez moi (genre Le Roy Merlin). La 2cv a ete importee aux USA a environ 1000 exemplaires mais n’a pas connu de succes a une epoque la ou tendance etait plutot a la grande voiture avec gros moteur.

Citroen in USA

2CVAlthough the 2CV was a tremedous sales success in Europe and throughout most of the world, when it was introduced with little fanfare to the American public in the early sixties, it became quickly apparent that the 2CV was an impossible sale to the average American driver. In the sixties the American auto manufacturers were still competing as to who could produce the biggest car with the largest engine and the flashiest fins. The fuel-efficient, underachieving, oddball-looking 2CV was a laughable abnomaly to the American buying public. Little more than a thousand were sold in less than a ten year period and, in 1970, several dozen were destroyed by Citroen when left-over models from the previous model year could no longer meet the increasingly stringent DOT standards. Citroen decided that destroying these unwanted 2CVs was more economical than shipping them back to France.

Much of the USA’s current 2CV population was imported in later years by enthusiasts (some with incorrect registrations and ID plates). The 425cc models are the most readily available but not really practical for anything other than around-town driving (as are the earlier 375cc models). The 602cc-engined Deuches can keep up with most of America’s traffic flow and parts, for the 1970 and on models, are also more readily available. Be wary of buying Eastern and Northern cars as the scantily-clad 2CV’s sheet metal is a magnet for rust (especially in the floor boards and wheel arches). Fortunately, with the aid of a repair manual, the car is easy to repair and home restorations, although just as time consuming as any other car, are certainly possible.

Manufactured from 1949 to 1990

Probably between 800 to 1,000 in North America

VIDEO:

How the latest 2cv models were fabricated in the 1990 in Portugal to please the passionate customers after the production which started in France in 1948 stopped in 1988.

James Bond escaping with a Citroen 2cv:

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s